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Posts Tagged ‘risk of trade’

Tyler Hicks has spent the last 10 days covering the fighting in Gaza City, and its aftermath. Mr. Hicks, a New York Times staff photographer, spoke with James Estrin by phone on Friday night from Gaza City. The conversation has been edited and condensed.

Q.

How are you?

A.

I’m mostly relieved. The truce seems to be holding.

Q.

Tell me what you saw this last week.

A.

I arrived in Gaza City on the 16th and right away it was clear that this wasn’t going to be resolved overnight. Bombs were being dropped by Israeli aircraft and there was a lot of tension on the street. Normally, it is quite busy in Gaza City and it takes time to get from place to place. But there were no traffic jams and the streets were mostly empty.

The bombing was constant and unrelenting. Most of it was concentrated overnight and in the early morning hours, though the bombing went on all day as well. Generally, it was heavier in the evening and early morning hours.

Read Full Article: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/26/a-responsibility-to-photograph-and-remember/

By James Estrin For The New York Times,  November 26, 2012

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The setting at the Waldorf-Astoria hotel on Tuesday represented the height of refinement, but Alan Rusbridger, editor in chief of The Guardian, reminded the black-tie crowd at the annual dinner for the Committee to Protect Journalists of something it knew all too well: in many parts of the globe, its profession is under murderous assault.

“Targeting journalism has become a trend, and now the people who are harassing and killing journalists include governments as well as the people you would expect,” said Mr. Rusbridger, who, along with others, was honored at the gathering in New York.

Read Full Article: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/26/business/media/using-war-as-cover-to-target-journalists.html?ref=global-home

By David Carr for The New York Times, November 25, 2012

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London, UK – Our job as journalists carries with it an inherent risk that affects us all, irrespective of our gender or ethnic background, because we go to places and events that people are trying to get away from: disaster zones, violent confrontations, and unrest.

However, the way that that risk plays itself out can be gender-specific.

In the field, being a woman can disarm aggressiveness and diffuse tension in interactions with authorities who have the power to facilitate or block access and passage.

That same “female factor” can also spiral out of control and turn into a threat of sexual assault. We heard horrific stories of American female journalists being attacked during the Egyptian revolution in 2011. There are many other cases we did not hear about because the victims are not Western.

Read Full Article: http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/2012/03/20123882326479522.html

by Zeina Awad publish by Aljazeera, 08 Mar 2012 12:47

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Anthony Shadid, a gifted foreign correspondent whose graceful dispatches for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and The Associated Press covered nearly two decades of Middle East conflict and turmoil, died, apparently of an asthma attack, on Thursday while on a reporting assignment in Syria. Tyler Hicks, a Times photographer who was with Mr. Shadid, carried his body across the border to Turkey.
Mr. Shadid, 43, had been reporting inside Syria for a week, gathering information on the Free Syrian Army and other armed elements of the resistance to the government of President Bashar al-Assad, whose military forces have been engaged in a harsh repression of the political opposition in a conflict that is now nearly a year old.

Read Full Article: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/17/world/middleeast/anthony-shadid-a-new-york-times-reporter-dies-in-syria.html?_r=4&pagewanted=1&hp&adxnnlx=1329483784-BtTy%2000csqjZfHfHPoR0Uw&

by By RICK GLADSTONE Publish by The New York times, February 16, 2012

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War photographers don’t do this because they’re addicted to danger. They’re just like any journalist who wants to do their job well, and they see no romance in it. You certainly think about the risks – last year, Sunday Mirror photographer Phil Coburn lost both his legs and reporter Rupert Hamer was killed in Afghanistan – but ultimately you decide that it’s more important to examine the world we live in. When you’ve got a camera in front of you, you focus on the work.

Read Full Article: http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2011/apr/22/sean-smith-frontline-reporting

by Sean Smith, Publish by The Guardian, Thursday 21 April 2011

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Amanda Lindhout was a waitress at an Irish pub in Calgary, Alberta, with a dream of becoming a journalist. But Ms. Lindhout, who has no formal journalistic training, did not join the ranks of citizen journalists who blog about their communities. Instead, she used her earnings from the bar to finance reporting trips to several of the world’s most dangerous war zones.

Ms. Lindhout and her Australian companion, Nigel Brennan, were released by Somali kidnappers, who had held them for ransom and abused them over the last 15 months. Despite the risks, suffering and capture, which reportedly ended with a payment of $600,000 raised by their families and friends, Ms. Lindhout’s achievements as a journalist have been modest.

Read full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/30/business/media/30somalia.html?_r=4&adxnnl=1&emc=eta1&adxnnlx=1259604071-AcUf7XjP5NmAOs7oOLt5YQ&

By IAN AUSTEN, for The New York Times, November 29, 2009

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2012 has been a big year for Somali media – after years of covering civil war, rising insurgency and a battle for resources, Somali journalists reported on the country’s first election in decades. But there is another reason 2012 has been significant: 13 journalists have been killed in the country this year. A suicide bomb attack in Mogadishu on September 20 killed three reporters. Hours later, unidentified gunmen shot dead veteran journalist Hassan Yusuf Absuge for covering the explosion.

Al-Shabaab, the armed group operating in Somalia, has claimed responsibility for a number of the killings this year, but they are by no means the only threat. There are no official regulations on what you can or cannot report but journalists trying to cover stories that criticise Al-Shabab, government, big business or certain clans and their leaders, do so at their peril.

In this week’s News Bytes: As Syria’s civil war gets bloodier, journalists and media activists are becoming ever more explicit targets for attack, latest deaths take the tally of professional journalists killed in Syria to 11 while 32 citizen journalists have been killed as well; the decision by the Iranian government to block access to Google’s search and mail services in the country – after widespread protests over the anti-Islam Youtube clip – is being seen as a step towards disconnecting Iran from the world-wide web completely; Vietnam, which has the second largest number of internet dissidents in jail in the world after China, is seeking to push through a new law which would require internet users to register with their real names and would impose further penalties for criticising the regime; Al-Watan, an Egyptian newspaper, is going to head-to-head with French weekly Charlie Hebdo that published cartoons of the Prophet Mohamed earlier this month. Al-Watan responded by publishing 13 cartoons depicting how the West sees the Muslim community in a post-9/11 world.

Our feature this week looks at the future of online news. In the early days of the internet websites competed with each other for your attention. Each new visitor to the website was an achievement. But things have changed. The battlefield may be the same but the war is now being faught for your money. And fighting the battle the hardest is the newspaper in the street. For years, print publications watched helplessly as the internet ate into their market.

Click here to read full article

Publish by Al Jazeera,September 29, 2012

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