Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘politics’

Tyler Hicks has spent the last 10 days covering the fighting in Gaza City, and its aftermath. Mr. Hicks, a New York Times staff photographer, spoke with James Estrin by phone on Friday night from Gaza City. The conversation has been edited and condensed.

Q.

How are you?

A.

I’m mostly relieved. The truce seems to be holding.

Q.

Tell me what you saw this last week.

A.

I arrived in Gaza City on the 16th and right away it was clear that this wasn’t going to be resolved overnight. Bombs were being dropped by Israeli aircraft and there was a lot of tension on the street. Normally, it is quite busy in Gaza City and it takes time to get from place to place. But there were no traffic jams and the streets were mostly empty.

The bombing was constant and unrelenting. Most of it was concentrated overnight and in the early morning hours, though the bombing went on all day as well. Generally, it was heavier in the evening and early morning hours.

Read Full Article: http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/26/a-responsibility-to-photograph-and-remember/

By James Estrin For The New York Times,  November 26, 2012

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

The setting at the Waldorf-Astoria hotel on Tuesday represented the height of refinement, but Alan Rusbridger, editor in chief of The Guardian, reminded the black-tie crowd at the annual dinner for the Committee to Protect Journalists of something it knew all too well: in many parts of the globe, its profession is under murderous assault.

“Targeting journalism has become a trend, and now the people who are harassing and killing journalists include governments as well as the people you would expect,” said Mr. Rusbridger, who, along with others, was honored at the gathering in New York.

Read Full Article: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/26/business/media/using-war-as-cover-to-target-journalists.html?ref=global-home

By David Carr for The New York Times, November 25, 2012

Read Full Post »

Austin Tice

Last month, a video surfaced on the Internet showing an American freelance journalist who had been captured in Syria by a group of armed men. It provided hope that Austin Tice may still be alive.

Tice, a 31-year-old Texan, went missing in a Damascus suburb in mid-August close to a town I lived in for 18 months before I left Syria last February. Shortly before he disappeared, Tice noted on Twitter that the town was “the most dangerous place I’ve been here” and that he was “glad to be out.”

Tice has clearly been apprehended, but we don’t know by whom. The U.S. State Department still believes the reporter is being held by government forces and says that it could not authenticate the video footage. Terrorism experts believe the video was staged.

Read full article: http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2012/10/17/stephen-starr-the-perils-of-reporting-from-syria/

Stephen Starr, Special to National Post, Oct 17, 2012 12:01

Read Full Post »

 

 

The family of Austin Tice, a journalist believed to be captured in Syria, has made an emotional plea for his release.

Tice, a freelance journalist for The Washington Post and McClatchy newspapers and a Georgetown law student, went missing in Syria in August. He appeared in footage that recently emerged, which showed him blindfolded by his captors.

His family reacted in a statement to Russia Today’s Arabic service, saying, “Knowing Austin is alive is comforting to our family, although it is difficult to see him in the circumstances recently depicted.”

Read Full Article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/05/austin-tice-family-syria-journalist_n_1943367.html?ncid=txtlnkushpmg00000041#slide=1239812

Publish by  Huff POF Media,  10/05/2012

Read Full Post »

Anthony Shadid, a gifted foreign correspondent whose graceful dispatches for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe and The Associated Press covered nearly two decades of Middle East conflict and turmoil, died, apparently of an asthma attack, on Thursday while on a reporting assignment in Syria. Tyler Hicks, a Times photographer who was with Mr. Shadid, carried his body across the border to Turkey.
Mr. Shadid, 43, had been reporting inside Syria for a week, gathering information on the Free Syrian Army and other armed elements of the resistance to the government of President Bashar al-Assad, whose military forces have been engaged in a harsh repression of the political opposition in a conflict that is now nearly a year old.

Read Full Article: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/17/world/middleeast/anthony-shadid-a-new-york-times-reporter-dies-in-syria.html?_r=4&pagewanted=1&hp&adxnnlx=1329483784-BtTy%2000csqjZfHfHPoR0Uw&

by By RICK GLADSTONE Publish by The New York times, February 16, 2012

Read Full Post »

Amanda Lindhout was a waitress at an Irish pub in Calgary, Alberta, with a dream of becoming a journalist. But Ms. Lindhout, who has no formal journalistic training, did not join the ranks of citizen journalists who blog about their communities. Instead, she used her earnings from the bar to finance reporting trips to several of the world’s most dangerous war zones.

Ms. Lindhout and her Australian companion, Nigel Brennan, were released by Somali kidnappers, who had held them for ransom and abused them over the last 15 months. Despite the risks, suffering and capture, which reportedly ended with a payment of $600,000 raised by their families and friends, Ms. Lindhout’s achievements as a journalist have been modest.

Read full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/30/business/media/30somalia.html?_r=4&adxnnl=1&emc=eta1&adxnnlx=1259604071-AcUf7XjP5NmAOs7oOLt5YQ&

By IAN AUSTEN, for The New York Times, November 29, 2009

Read Full Post »

Many retired officers hold a perch in the world of military contracting, but General McCaffrey is among a select few who also command platforms in the news media and as government advisers on military matters. These overlapping roles offer them an array of opportunities to advance policy goals as well as business objectives. But with their business ties left undisclosed, it can be difficult for policy makers and the public to fully understand their interests.

Read full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/30/washington/30general.html?hp

By DAVID BARSTOW  for The New York times
Published: November 29, 2008

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »