Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘foreign correspondance’

Afghan Dreams logo

WASHINGTON, DC, 5 March 2016 — Our film, “Afghan Dreams,” won the jury award for Best Documentary Short at the Las Cruces International Film Festival in Las Cruces, New Mexico.

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Application Deadline: March 1, 2013
 
The Program: Launched in 1949 with support from the Carnegie Corporation, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) Edward R. Murrow Press Fellowship seeks to promote the quality of responsible and discerning journalism that exemplified the work of Edward R. Murrow. In 1965, the program was renamed in his honor and is supported by the CBS Foundation and Ford Foundation. One CFR resident fellowship is awarded each year to a distinguished foreign correspondent or editor. The Edward R. Murrow Press Fellow spends nine months full time in residence at CFR’s headquarters in New York. The program enables the fellow to engage in sustained analysis and writing, expand his or her intellectual and professional horizons, and extensively participate in CFR’s active program of meetings and events.
Eligibility: The program is only open to applicants who have distinguished credentials in the field of journalism and who have covered international news as a working journalist for print, broadcast, or online media widely available in the United States. Applicants are limited to those individuals who are authorized to work in the United States and who will continue to be authorized for the duration of the fellowship. CFR does not sponsor for visas.
 
Fellowship Award: The program awards a stipend of $65,000 as well as a modest travel grant. The fellow is considered an independent contractor rather than an employee of CFR, and is not eligible for employment benefits, including health insurance.
Application Deadline: Interested candidates who meet the program’s eligibility requirements can Apply Online between January 1 and March 12013.
 
For More Information: Contact fellowships@cfr.org or 212.434.9740.

Read Full Post »

 

 

The family of Austin Tice, a journalist believed to be captured in Syria, has made an emotional plea for his release.

Tice, a freelance journalist for The Washington Post and McClatchy newspapers and a Georgetown law student, went missing in Syria in August. He appeared in footage that recently emerged, which showed him blindfolded by his captors.

His family reacted in a statement to Russia Today’s Arabic service, saying, “Knowing Austin is alive is comforting to our family, although it is difficult to see him in the circumstances recently depicted.”

Read Full Article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/05/austin-tice-family-syria-journalist_n_1943367.html?ncid=txtlnkushpmg00000041#slide=1239812

Publish by  Huff POF Media,  10/05/2012

Read Full Post »

Combat photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros were killed Wednesday in Libya, and two more photographers were seriously injured. On Thursday’s Fresh Air, we air an interview taped Tuesday with combat photographers Greg Marinovich and Joao Silva, both of whom have been seriously injured in the field.

Marinovich has been shot and wounded four times while covering conflicts in South Africa and Afghanistan. Silva lost both of his legs in a land mine explosion in Afghanistan last October while working as a contract photographer for The New York Times.

Read Full Article and listen to Audio interview : http://www.npr.org/2011/04/21/135513724/two-war-photographers-on-their-injuries-ethics?sc=fb&cc=fp

Publish by NPR.ORG, April 21, 2011

Read Full Post »

2012 has been a big year for Somali media – after years of covering civil war, rising insurgency and a battle for resources, Somali journalists reported on the country’s first election in decades. But there is another reason 2012 has been significant: 13 journalists have been killed in the country this year. A suicide bomb attack in Mogadishu on September 20 killed three reporters. Hours later, unidentified gunmen shot dead veteran journalist Hassan Yusuf Absuge for covering the explosion.

Al-Shabaab, the armed group operating in Somalia, has claimed responsibility for a number of the killings this year, but they are by no means the only threat. There are no official regulations on what you can or cannot report but journalists trying to cover stories that criticise Al-Shabab, government, big business or certain clans and their leaders, do so at their peril.

In this week’s News Bytes: As Syria’s civil war gets bloodier, journalists and media activists are becoming ever more explicit targets for attack, latest deaths take the tally of professional journalists killed in Syria to 11 while 32 citizen journalists have been killed as well; the decision by the Iranian government to block access to Google’s search and mail services in the country – after widespread protests over the anti-Islam Youtube clip – is being seen as a step towards disconnecting Iran from the world-wide web completely; Vietnam, which has the second largest number of internet dissidents in jail in the world after China, is seeking to push through a new law which would require internet users to register with their real names and would impose further penalties for criticising the regime; Al-Watan, an Egyptian newspaper, is going to head-to-head with French weekly Charlie Hebdo that published cartoons of the Prophet Mohamed earlier this month. Al-Watan responded by publishing 13 cartoons depicting how the West sees the Muslim community in a post-9/11 world.

Our feature this week looks at the future of online news. In the early days of the internet websites competed with each other for your attention. Each new visitor to the website was an achievement. But things have changed. The battlefield may be the same but the war is now being faught for your money. And fighting the battle the hardest is the newspaper in the street. For years, print publications watched helplessly as the internet ate into their market.

Click here to read full article

Publish by Al Jazeera,September 29, 2012

Read Full Post »